Another Vasculitis Sufferer Passed Away This Week…

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me at the Lauren Currie Twilight Cabin in Scotland

Yesterday yet another Vasculitis sufferer passed away.

Iranian bodybuilder Baitollah Abbaspour died early on Tuesday after only a year-long battle with Vasculitis. Of course while I don’t know him personally, I make sure to follow as many vascular disease / autoimmune disease cases around the world as possible–as what we have is rare and I do not know anyone else in my area of residence with the chronic illness. Unfortunately, he was only diagnosed this year, so his case was most likely already at an aggressive stage that had no possibility for physical reparations. I was diagnosed in 2011 and although my case was also extremely aggressive, I was fortunate to have a team of doctors suit up–along with my faith in God–and right now, it is safe to say I have been in remission for the time being.

Two weeks ago I took a much anticipated trip to the Lauren Currie Twilight Cabin in a small town called Dalavich in Oban, Scotland. It was absolutely breathtaking. Lauren Currie’s life was taken away early due to Vasculitis as well, so it was something that had been on my bucket list to pay homage to her family, who has heavily fought in creating awareness on this vicious disease. Read more about their story on the Lauren Currie Foundation website.

What is Vasculitis?

Vasculitis is an inflammation of blood vessels. The disorder forces changes in the walls of blood vessels, namely thickening, weakening, narrowing and scarring. The changes impede blood circulation, and eventually lead to organ and tissue damage. Read my easy breakdown of the disease here.

I’ve been on a batch of medications and treatments, and thankfully my current regimen has been working to stabilize my condition–I can work, run errands, participate in physical activities, and live as normal a life as possible.

A few months ago I wrote about a new initiative The Vasculitis Foundation (in the United States) is taking to conduct better research on the disease. Since it is so rare, there isn’t a lot of information out there that is easily accessible pertaining to Vasculitis. I hope one day soon we can collectively change that.

 

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